Living Better: Interview With My Guru

Dawnie is my personal guru and all around speaker of all the wisdom.She has battled chronic illness for the better part of a decade, and uses the knowledge she’s gained to help others on their paths. She can be found sharing her life at The Dawnie Project.

LBMyGuru

Dawnie recently agreed to let me interview her. It went something like this.

1. You were the first person to introduce me to Christine’s Spoon Theory, and the term spoonie. I distinctly remember that moment, because it changed how I saw myself, and how I could understand my new life. How did you learn of the Spoon Theory and was it a similar experience for you?

When I was first diagnosed I went into shock with anger. It was two and a half years in. I had spent that time trying to fix my pain, only to be told that I had an incurable condition. I spent a few months feeling sorry for myself, pushing everyone away. Then I woke up in the acceptance stage and started looking for a support group. I believe it was the second meeting when someone mentioned the spoon theory. I looked it up online, and had my a-ha moment. That was the day I stopped treating myself like I was sick, and started advocating instead. I no longer wanted people to think of me as broken, but rather to understand why 9 out of 10 times I had to say no but that it was worth asking me for that 1 time I could say yes.

2. You’re one of the few people I know who have found a balance between western and alternative medicine, and a medical team who works with you to maintain this balance. Can you share some tips for people who are looking to incorporate more homeopathic means of care?

The first few years post diagnosis were filled with specialists providing opinions on various treatments to help with issues connected to my condition. When a doctor suggested I join a drug trial not yet approved in the US I stopped. I fired all my specialists and told my family doctor I wanted to try alternative medicine. I got lucky that she agreed to help me.

I found an acupuncturist who worked on my allergies, my pain, and my insomnia. Within a year I went from 9 drugs a day down to 2. I then took a leap of faith and flew to NY to see a homeopathic doctor who started in western medicine and tired of seeing his colleagues push drugs. He walked me through a variety of tests to determine what supplements my body was lacking, what supplements my body could handle, and what foods might boost my immune system without adding to the imbalance. He was expensive ($1500 plus travel) but he might have saved my life.

Homeopathic medicine doesn’t work for everyone, just as western medicine doesn’t. Western medicine failed me, but that’s not the fault of the drugs. My body simply didn’t react as expected. I think anyone with a chronic or incurable condition should research all options for relief. Acupuncture and supplements combined with a specific diet put my condition into remission, but I know a dozen others it didn’t help. If I could offer one piece of advice it would be to knowledge share for research purposes. Oh, and fire any doctor who won’t listen to you with compassion and empathy.

3. We all have days where we pull the covers back up stay in bed. What are your go-to comforts for those yucky days?

Remission doesn’t mean every day is a good one. I still have side effect conditions that are active, and flares now and then. When that happens I like to curl up on the couch with a fuzzy blanket, some hot tea, and whatever movies I’m in the mood for.

4. You’re a frequent traveler, both around the US, as well as a recent trip to Africa. What are your top tips for making a vacation as great as possible, in spite of chronic illness?

I’ve always loved to travel, and for the first few years of my condition I wasn’t able to, because I told myself it was too hard. I let myself take the easy way out and suffered because of it. Eventually I buckled down and made a list of what it would take to make travel work for me again. My packing list expanded to include drugs, supplements, teas, heating pad, slippers, and whatever else I would need to give me the comforts of home. I researched my destination to learn the layout, as well as travel to get there. If flying I made sure I had an aisle seat so I could move around. If driving I looked up rest stop locations so I knew how many miles between. I packed snacks that I might not find on my travels. I did whatever it took to reduce the stress of the unknown. I became an over packer, but it was worth it to be able to go.

5. Something we’ve discussed much here on the blog, as well as in many conversations you and I’ve shared, is the effects stress can have on our symptoms, and possible flares. How do you combat the everyday stress of money, life, family, etc?

Having a chronic incurable condition is going to be stressful, even in remission. That’s life. The best thing you can do for yourself is to stop fighting it. Accept your limitations, decide how you’re going to work around them, how you plan to occasionally test them, and then live your life. You will never be the person you were, because people change with time. Deal with it.

6. Because of you, and friends like you, I’ve been encouraged to chase dreams, in spite of chronic illness. What is something you’ve done since your diagnosis which you never dreamed you’d be able to achieve? What goal are you currently working towards?

I have always wanted to travel to Africa and the Serengeti. After being diagnosed I thought it would be impossible. There were simply too many comforts of home I would have to leave behind. What if I’m in pain there? What if I get sick? What if I stop worrying about what if and start plotting how to make it work?

It took a 20 hour flight to get there, with 6 days in the wild tracking the great migration, and then a 25 hour flight home. Without a doubt I had to let go of comforts of home to make it happen. But it was worth every moment. When you let go of your fear and anxiety you discover a whole new world of possibility. Driving around on bumpy dirt roads in an old jeep wasn’t easy on the body, but then we’d stop twenty feet from a lion resting on the side of the road and it would take your breath away. Suddenly that ache didn’t feel so bad anymore.

My next goal? I haven’t dreamt it yet. Whatever it is, I’ll find a way to make it happen.

 

I can’t thank Dawnie enough for sitting down with me to share her wisdom with all my readers. If you’d like to know more about her and her path, be sure to follow along at The Dawnie Project. 

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5 thoughts on “Living Better: Interview With My Guru

  1. What an inspiring lady! I have so much damage already done to my body I am scared to go off meds completely and try a homeopathic route.

    1. I know that feeling, and I would never encourage dropping meds to experiment. The thing about homeopathy is that it can compliment western medicine. It took a year to reduce the meds, a little at a time only after my body no longer needed them. I’m glad I did the research and listened to my own instincts. I encourage everyone to do the same and consider all options available to them. Good luck in your journey!

      1. Thanks Dawnie, that is great to hear that homeopathy compliments western meds. I am bad about taking my meds, I don’t like taking my maintenance drugs when I’m feeling fine but I end up hurting myself in my own stubborness. I’m on remicade every 6 weeks and that I can’t skip. I probably need to visit your site to see but where did you start in your research? I have tried eliminating foods from my diet but it didn’t make a difference. My RA triggers seem to be hormonal, stress and weather.

  2. What an inspiring lady! I have so much damage already done to my body I am scared to go off meds completely and try a homeopathic route. I hope you share this with our #SmallVictoriesSundayLinkup this week. Linkup goes live at midnight for this week!

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